HeatSmart Massachusetts (HeatSmart Mass) seeks to increase the adoption of small-scale clean heating and cooling technologies in participating communities through a competitive solicitation process that aggregates homeowner buying power to lower installation prices for participants.

MassCEC will not be offering funding for 2021 HeatSmart campaigns

If you have an interest in running a HeatSmart-style campaign in the upcoming year, please review the resources under the Solarize-HeatSmart Toolkit tab and stay tuned for more materials to be posted in the coming months. Additionally, if you would like to speak with MassCEC for guidance please reach out to heatsmartmass@masscec.com, and we can set up a time to speak with you!

Communities with a higher prevalence of high cost heating fuels are great candidates for HeatSmart-style program! Households with high cost heating fuels (oil, electric resistance, and propane) will see the highest cost savings for switching to clean heating and cooling. Review this map to see the number of households in your community that heat with high cost heating fuels.

Individuals interested in participating in the program must own property located in a community that is running an active HeatSmart Mass program. To see a map of communities that have participated or are participating, click here.

 

2020 HeatSmart Mass Program 

The following communities are participating in the 2020 round:

Melrose

Newton

2019 HeatSmart Mass Completed Programs & Earlier Rounds

Several communities who participated in the 2019 HeatSmart Mass Program have now completed their campaigns.

For final results for all communities: see HeatSmart Mass Program Results page for final information on all campaigns.

For contact information:

For individual community contact information, email heatsmart@masscec.com

This toolkit was last updated on October 6th and is in the process of being developed. Check back next month for additional resources, and the complete version at the end of the year.

Currently this toolkit covers the first steps needed to initiate a basic plan for a clean energy adoption campaign in your community. As of now, it includes technology training videos, outreach tools, and marketing strategy templates. In its completion it will offer additional resources to assist in installer selection, campaign management, event planning and campaign wrap-up and analysis.

 

Step 1 - Clean Energy Technology Training

The first step to running your Solarize or HeatSmart-like campaign is selecting which clean energy technologies to promote within your community. It's important that you and your team understand the basics on your selected technologies, so you can help educate other residents in your community and answer their questions. You can begin learning more about these clean energy technologies by watching training videos on the MassCEC Youtube page. Start by viewing 'Introduction to Clean Energy Technologies for Homes' and then explore the other videos. 

Step 2 - Campaign Exploration

In this stage you will explore past program overviews, best practices, and general logistics to help you understand the fundamental steps to implementing a clean energy adoption campaign that you will strategically plan for in the next section. It’s important to understand the time commitment that needs to be made, who all of the campaign’s stakeholders are and their level of support or readiness to adopt clean energy technologies.

Understand the program: The following resources will help you explore running your campaign in the traditional way and/or identify areas and strategies to alter to help tailor your campaign to your community.

Conduct Outreach: The following resources will help you reach out to valuable stakeholders, such as community members and past participants, to better prepare and tailor your campaign

  • Solarize Mass Campaign Outreach Techniques - Review a list of techniques used to conduct outreach and market through previous Solarize and HeatSmart programs. This will be important to use for both planning and implementation phases.
  • Past Solarize-HeatSmart Municipal Representative Contact Info - Reach out to people that have previously run a Solarize or HeatSmart campaign to receive feedback and compare experiences.

  • Template Community Interest Survey - Send out to your neighbors and post on town websites or Facebook groups to see if residents are interested in switching to clean energy technologies, and as a method for identifying which technologies to promote. This list of interested contacts can become a valuable resource in order to share initial leads with your selected installers.

  • Template Collaborator Commitment Letter - This template was used to provide confirmation to MassCEC of another entity’s commitment to support and help promote your campaign. This entity may be a local environmental nonprofit, community organization, or the municipality. Campaigns that collaborate with another entity tend to have more success due to diversity of perspective and a wider range of resources for community outreach and marketing. 

  • High-Cost Heating Fuels Map – Review this map to identify what percentage of households in your community heat with high cost heating fuels like oil, electric resistance, and propane. These households will see the highest cost savings for switching to clean heating and cooling technologies so are great candidates for a HeatSmart campaign.

  • Use the Clean Energy Technology 101 Flyers (listed under Step 1) to help explain and educate stakeholders during outreach.

Step 3 - Campaign and Marketing Planning:

In this stage of planning, you want to detail your overall campaign and marketing strategy. This requires you to utilize your insights from ‘Step 2 – Campaign Exploration’ to identify your team members, partners, campaign goals, marketing tactics, and timeline.

  • Community RFP - Utilize the traditional MassCEC Request for Proposals for Solarize Mass and HeatSmart Mass to better understand the typical program process. It includes descriptions of program roles and responsibilities, details of what best qualifies and prepares a community, and describes the timeline of the traditional program. Complete the following documents that were traditionally required to submit the community application:
    • Proposal Checklist and Application – This application will help you concretely establish your goals as well as provide a template to draft your own campaign marketing proposal. This may prove useful if you seek to gain approval from your municipality or to engage other partners.
      • Check out the Community Marketing Proposals (under the Program Background tab below) for examples of strategies submitted by past communities.
    • Signature and Acceptance Form – This form will help you collect and identify the contact info for all necessary team members.
    • HeatSmart or Solarize Coach Commitment Form – This form will summarize the traditional responsibilities of the HeatSmart or Solarize Coach and secure a commitment from them.
    • Volunteer Commitment Form – This form secures a commitment from all volunteers.
    • Template Community Contract – This exemplifies the commitment that communities traditionally made to MassCEC. Many of the guidelines are specific to MassCEC and may not be applicable to your community and the partner entity you may choose, but it can be used as a template and edited for appropriate use.
  • Community Outreach Plan Template - Plan and identify potential outreach opportunities for the campaign and continue to update each week to help track campaign progress.
  • MAPC Example Stakeholder List - Identify specific stakeholders within your community to target and strategies to use to engage them.  
  • Resources for further consideration – The following resources allow you to preview some of the next steps in implementing your campaign such as launching a website, utilizing social media, and holding events, but can also help you develop a more thorough marketing plan beyond your initial strategy.

If you have an interest in running a HeatSmart-style campaign in the upcoming year, and would like to speak with MassCEC for guidance please reach out to heatsmart@masscec.com, and we can set up a time to speak with you!

 

*This toolkit was last updated on October 6, 2020. Check back next month for additional resources.

The HeatSmart Massachusetts Program is a partnership between MassCEC and Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources (DOER).

How it works

HeatSmart Mass is a community-based outreach and education program that will encourage the adoption of clean heating and cooling technologies including air-source heat pumps, ground-source heat pumps, automated wood heating, and solar hot water. The Program aims to increase community awareness and increase adoption of residential and small-scale commercial clean heating and cooling installations through a group purchasing model. HeatSmart Mass, now launching its third year of campaigns, is modeled on the highly successful Solarize Massachusetts program, which is now in its tenth year. 

Each participating community competitively selects designated installer(s) to offer one or more of the clean heating and cooling technologies to interested residents.

HeatSmart Mass Community Marketing Proposals

Developing a marketing proposal prior to the launch of a community group purchasing campaign can provide a useful roadmap for communities and may benefit program results. It may be helpful to refer to the marketing plans for the communities that participated in the HeatSmart Pilot or 2019 round, or are currently participating in the 2020 round. All community marketing plans and other resources are available below.

HeatSmart Mass Community Marketing Proposals & Technologies (2018-2020)
2020

Melrose

  • Air-source heat pumps, ground-source heat pumps, and solar hot water

Newton

  • Air-source heat pumps and heat pump water heaters
   
2019

Arlington-Winchester

  • Air-source heat pumps, ground-source heat pumps, automated wood heating, and solar hot water

Belmont

  • Air-source heat pumps

Hudson-Stow

  • Air-source heat pumps, and ground-source heat pumps

Marshfield

  • Air-source heat pumps, ground-source heat pumps, automated wood heating, and solar hot water
2018

Bolton-Harvard

  • Air-source heat pumps, and ground-source heat pumps

Concord-Carlisle-Lincoln

  • Air-source heat pumps, ground-source heat pumps, automated wood heating

Great Barrington

  • Air-source heat pumps

Nantucket

  • Air-source heat pumps (proposal only), and solar hot water

 

Program Results

To see a map of communities that have participated or are participating, as well as their total program contracts, click here.

Pilot Program Results

 

Initial Interests

Site Visits

Contracts Signed

Community

ASHP

GSHP

AWH

SHW

ASHP

GSHP

AWH

SHW

ASHP

GSHP

AWH

SHW

Bolton/Harvard

176

119

- -

118

52

-

-

35

12

-

-

Carlisle/Concord/Lincoln

273

164

56

-

163

62

1

-

40

23

1

-

Nantucket

-

- -

61

-

- -

14

- - -

5

Great Barrington

73

-

- -

40

-

- -

1

-

- -
Total 522 283 56 61 321 114 1 14 76 35 1 5

 

2019 Program Results (updated on 3/9/2020, final numbers still in progress)

 

Initial Interests

Site Visits

Contracts Signed

Community

ASHP

GSHP

AWH

SHW

ASHP

GSHP

AWH

SHW

ASHP

GSHP

AWH

SHW

Arlington/Winchester

554 260 68 281 377 34 10 123 154 10 2 58
Belmont 220 - - - 114 - - - 42 - - -
Hudson/Stow 257 26 - - 183 18 - - 63 7 - -
Marshfield 35 13 10 20 18 1 0 10 6 0 0 3
Total 1066 299 78 301 692 53 10 133 265 17 2 61