All MassCEC Programs

MassCEC offers a number of programs to help grow the clean energy industry in Massachusetts, with offerings helping residents, businesses, non-profits and government agencies finance the planning and implementation of clean energy projects. MassCEC programs also help clean energy businesses grow their operations in Massachusetts. Below is an alphabetical list of programs currently offered by MassCEC.

Academic Collaboration - Who's Eligible?

  • Proposals that satisfy the definition of “clean energy” are eligible for funding.  MGL c. 23J s. 1 defines this as “...advanced and applied technologies that significantly reduce or eliminate the use of energy from non-renewable sources, including, but not limited to: energy efficiency; demand response; energy conservation and those technologies powered in whole or in part by the sun, wind, water, biomass, alcohol, wood, fuel cells any renewable, non-depletable or recyclable fuel...”

AccelerateMass - FAQ

What is a convertible grant?

A: A convertible grant is a financial instrument that is initially provided as a grant and, upon obtaining a Qualified Financing  or  other funding  milestone, the  grant converts  into  an  equity stake  in  the  company.  If  a  Qualified Financing  or  other  funding  milestone  is  not  reached,  the  convertible grant  remains  a  grant  until  the  term expires, at which point it may convert into equity at the then current fair market value, at MassCEC’s option.

AmplifyMass - FAQ

What is the amount of an AmplifyMass award?

For university research teams: the lesser of 5% of the total project cost, or $100,000.

For small businesses: the lesser of 10% of the total project cost, or $300,000.

How long after submitting my AmplifyMass application should I expect a response from MassCEC?

AmplifyMass - Program History

AmplifyMass provides awards to Massachusetts-based ARPA-E awardees to satisfy a portion of the cost share requirement of ARPA-E (Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy), an agency of the U.S. Department of Energy with a mission to support energy technology innovations that will enhance the economic and energy security of the United States. Winners of ARPA-E awards are required to provide a portion of the total project budge in cost share via in-kind resources, cash contributions or a combination of both.

ASHP Business - FAQ

How much funding can my business receive?

Small-scale projects are eligible for rebates of up to $12,000, with higher incentives up to $30,000 for projects at affordable housing.

Commercial-scale systems are eligible for rebates of up to $93,750, with higher incentives up to $225,000 for projects at affordable housing.

ASHP Govt/NP - FAQ

How much funding can my non-profit or government facility receive?

Small-scale projects are eligible for rebates of up to $16,000, with higher incentives up to $30,000 for projects at affordable housing.

Commercial-scale systems are eligible for rebates of up to $120,000, with higher incentives up to $225,000 for projects at affordable housing.

ASHP Govt/NP - How Do I Apply?

MassCEC has different application requirements depending on your system size. Any non-profit or government facility installing a system with a heating capacity up to 240,000 BTU/hr should read the instructions for the Small-Scale Air-Source Heat Pump program, while any non-profit or government facility installing a system with a heating capacity over 240,000 BTU/hr should read the instructions for the Commercial-Scale Program.

Business - Biomass FAQ

How much funding will my business receive?

Small-scale systems are eligible for awards of up to $27,000, and commercial-scale systems are eligible for up to $250,000. The awards are based on a percentage of eligible project costs (as defined in the Program Manual), with “adders” for thermal storage, cascading systems, distribution system efficiency, public and non-profit entities, and for multifamily affordable housing developments, of up to $250,000.  More details can be found in Section 3 of the Small-Scale Program Manual and Commercial-Scale Program Manual.

Catalyst - Apply

The application period for the Fall 2016 Catalyst Program round is now closed. Thank you to all who applied!
Please check back in January 2017 for information on our Spring solicitation. 

Catalyst - Program Background

The Catalyst Program is jointly administered by MassCEC and the Massachusetts Technology Transfer Center (MTTC) with the primary intent of stimulating the commercialization of clean energy and water innovation technologies developed in the Commonwealth. Awarded funds are used to demonstrate the feasibility of technologies in specific industry applications in order to obtain increased industry and investor interest.

Catalyst - Who's Eligible?

Eligible applicants must be either a principal Investigator (“PI”) at a Massachusetts-based nonprofit research institution or a Massachusetts-based early stage clean energy company with no more than $1 million in combined financing, grant funding and revenues within the past 5 years and have four or fewer full-time equivalent employees. Student teams are welcome to apply. 

Central Wood Pellet Heating - FAQ

How much will my rebate be?

Homeowners are eligible for a base rebate of up to $10,000, depending on system cost. To help cover the cost of thermal storage, MassCEC also offers a thermal storage adder up to $2,000. Residents qualifying for the Income-Based Rebate Adder can qualify for a total award of up to $16,500.

When can I use the emergency replacement option?

Clean Energy Internship Program (Employers) - Program Background

Since its inception in 2011, the Massachusetts Clean Energy Internship Program has placed hundreds of students and recent graduates at clean energy companies across the Commonwealth, with dozens of those interns going on to receive full-time job opportunities at their host companies.

The program helps provide Massachusetts clean energy businesses with a talented pool of young professionals, with MassCEC providing stipends for interns during fall, spring and summer sessions.

Clean Energy Internship Program (Interns) - Program Background

Since its inception in 2011, the Massachusetts Clean Energy Internship Program has placed hundreds of students and recent graduates at clean energy companies across the Commonwealth, with dozens of those interns going on to receive full-time job opportunities at their host companies.

The program helps provide Massachusetts clean energy businesses with a talented pool of young professionals, with MassCEC providing stipends for interns during fall, spring and summer sessions.

Clean Energy Internship Program (Interns) - Who's Eligible?

To participate in the program, students must attend, or have recently graduated within the past year from, a Massachusetts college or university, or they must be a Massachusetts resident, with proof of residency, who attended an out-of-state college or university. Students pursuing a master’s degree are eligible for this program, though Ph.D. candidates are not.

Commonwealth Wind (Business) - FAQ

How many megawatts (MW) of wind power are installed in New England?

As of July 2016, roughly 1,040 MW of wind power were operating in New England.

How many megawatts (MW) of wind power are installed in the US?

As of July 2016, over 74,000 MW of wind power were operating in the US.

How many Massachusetts towns have installed wind turbines?

As of September 2016, 34 MA towns installed large-scale (100kW and greater) wind turbines. There are numerous small scale turbines (<100kW) that are not included in this total.

Commonwealth Wind (Business) - Program Background

Commonwealth Wind and its predecessor programs have been providing support to electric customers and the wind community since 2000 and have helped to establish the Commonwealth as a thought leader in the field of appropriate wind energy development. MassCEC’s programmatic approach to appropriate siting for wind projects combines rigorous project analysis with careful, open decision making that involves all stakeholders.

Commonwealth Wind supports small wind, community wind and commercial wind projects. These are defined as:

Commonwealth Wind (Business) - Who's Eligible?

Eligible applicants include legally-registered corporations, limited liability companies, business organizations (for profit or not-for-profit) and public entities – including federal, state and local government. Private individuals are  eligible for funding only for small wind installations where the power is used on-site.

For detailed eligibility requirements for residential, commercial and community wind projects, see the Commonwealth Wind Program Manual

Commonwealth Wind Program - FAQ

How many megawatts (MW) of wind power are installed in New England?

As of October 2015, roughly 850 MW of wind power were operating in New England.

How many megawatts (MW) of wind power are installed in the US?

As of June 2015, 68,000 MW of wind power were operating in the US.

How many Massachusetts towns have installed wind turbines?

As of November 2015, 34 MA towns installed large-scale (100kW and greater) wind turbines. There are numerous small scale turbines (<100kW) that are not included in this total.

Commonwealth Wind Program - Program Background

Commonwealth Wind and its predecessor programs have been providing support to electric customers and the wind community since 2000 and have helped to establish the Commonwealth as a thought leader in the field of appropriate wind energy development. MassCEC’s programmatic approach to appropriate siting for wind projects combines rigorous project analysis with careful, open decision making that involves all stakeholders.

Commonwealth Wind supports small wind, community wind and commercial wind projects. These are defined as:

Commonwealth Wind Program - Who's Eligible?

Eligible applicants include legally-registered corporations, limited liability companies, business organizations (for profit or not-for-profit) and public entities – including federal, state and local government. Private individuals are  eligible for funding only for small wind installations where the power is used on-site.

For detailed eligibility requirements for residential, commercial and community wind projects, see the Commonwealth Wind Program Manual

Commonwealth Woodstove Change-Out - Program Background

This program is currently closed to new applications. The information on this page is for reference only.  

A partnership between MassCEC,  the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) and the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources (DOER), the Commonwealth Woodstove Change-Out Program committed $700,000 in funding for change-outs in 2016, the fifth round of funding since the progam's launch in 2012.

Community Microgrid (Government/Non-Profit) - Who's Eligible?

Feasibility assessment grants will be provided through a competitive solicitation open to municipalities and their public works departments, electric distribution companies, municipal light plants, emergency services departments, owners of critical infrastructure such as hospitals and financial institutions, self-organized groups of commercial building owners, developers or any entity that either owns property within a proposed microgrid or can demonstrate that they represent stakeholders with the capability of developing a multi-user microgrid.

DeployMass - Program Background

DeployMass was launched in 2014 in response to the barriers and challenges facing both public entities and innovative cleantech and water innovation companies in working together to save the Commonwealth energy and public dollars. Through the program, MassCEC works with these companies to identify customers, navigate procurement barriers and provide technical and financial assistance in connecting their technologies with public entities.  MassCEC is committed to providing one or more of the following forms of support to awardees:

DeployMass - Who's Eligible

DeployMass is a two-phase program, first assessing the technical and commercial readiness of emerging technologies, and then providing support to connect the most viable technologies with the public entities looking to adopt them. Eligible companies are based in Massachusetts and have advanced and applied technologies that significantly reduce or eliminate the use of energy from non-renewable sources.

Equity Investments - FAQ

What is the typical size of a MassCEC Equity Investment?

The average size of a MassCEC equity investment is $500,000, but investments have ranged anywhere from $100,000 - $1,500,000.. Additionally, MassCEC reserves up to $250,000 per-company for aggregate follow-on investments. Our financial support is designed to decrease over time in accordance with the MassCEC Follow-On Policy

How does MassCEC compare to a typical private investor?

Equity Investments - How Do I Apply?

Step 1: Contact the Investments team to set up an initial meeting. Please provide a pitch deck with your initial outreach.

Step 2: Pitch to the MassCEC Investments team.

Step 3: If your company may be a fit for a MassCEC equity investment, staff will request and internally review due diligence materials as part of an iterative process.  

Step 4: Pending a positive diligence outcome, pitch to the MassCEC CEO and other executive-level staff.

Ground Source Heat Pumps - FAQ

How much will my rebate be?

Homeowners are eligible for a base rebate of up to $12,500, depending on system size and efficiency. Residents qualifying for the Income-Based Rebate Adder can qualify for an award of up to $20,000. More detail can be found in section 3 of the Program Manual. 

Are more efficient heat pumps more expensive?

Although higher-efficiency heat pumps can be more expensive, MassCEC’s rebate is structured to compensate homeowners for this extra cost through adders that can range up to $5,000 per system.

Ground-Source Heat Pumps (Business) - How Do I Apply?

MassCEC has different application requirements depending on your system size. A business installing a system with a heating capacity over 120,000 BTU/hr should read the instructions for the Commercial-Scale Ground-Source Heat Pump (GSHP) Program. A business installing a system with a heating capacity up to 120,000 BTU/hr should read the instructions for the Small-Scale GSHP Program.

Ground-Source Heat Pumps (Government/Non-Profit) - How Do I Apply?

MassCEC has different application requirements depending on your system size. A non-profit or government facility installing a system with a heating capacity over 120,000 BTU/hr should read the instructions for the Commercial-Scale Ground-Source Heat Pump (GSHP) Program. A facility installing a system with a heating capacity up to 120,000 BTU/hr should read the instructions for the Small-Scale GSHP Program.

Hydropower - Eligibility

The applicant’s facility must be licensed by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), have an order from FERC indicating that it is non-jurisdictional to FERC, or have a determination from FERC that it is a "qualifying conduit hydropower facility."

IncubateMass - FAQ

While it is required to report paid employees, both full time and part time, what about employees or founders who have been compensated with equity?

If the employee is working for the company in any capacity, even for equity, they must be reported in the employee figures. While overall employee payroll must be reported, the amount of equity being paid to employees does not.

Should applicant responses be formatted as tables like those provided, presented in narrative form, or both?

IncubateMass - Program Background

MassCEC’s IncubateMass program was established in 2013 in response to the growing number of incubators in Massachusetts and the need for increased development and support of incubation space for cleantech and water innovation startup companies. MassCEC created the IncubateMass program to provide support to incubators that work with clean energy and water innovation startups on a competitive basis, tying funding to performance metrics. 

IncubateMass - Who's Eligible

All IncubateMass applicants must be Massachusetts-based incubators capable of providing business incubator services to cleantech or water innovation startups. Applicants should have experienced management teams, a documented track record of providing effective services to cleantech startups and a sustainable incubator model backed up by a credible business plan.  

InnovateMass - FAQ

If I’ve applied in the past, but was not awarded, may I re-use the same letters of intent from my project partners?

Yes, if the letters are still applicable with any changes you’ve made in your application and if the relationship is still active. The letters should demonstrate an active relationship and cooperation with critical partners, which will last at least the duration of the proposed project. To this end current letters are preferred, as it indicates that the cooperating parties are still in the relevant positions and the relationship is ongoing.

InnovateMass - Program Backgrond

InnovateMass was specifically designed to provide targeted, strategic support to companies facing the so called “commercialization valley of death,” a widely-recognized funding gap that exists between early-stage support offered by angel investors and later-stage support historically provided by venture capital and strategic investors.

InnovateMass - Who's Eligible?

Only technologies that have achieved Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 5 will be considered eligible for an InnovateMass grant.

Application Teams may comprise both public and private entities, including clean energy companies, research and development institutions, academic institutions, state, local, and quasi-governmental agencies, school districts and nonprofits.

Innovation at Wastewater Treatment Plants - Background

To make Massachusetts a global leader in water innovation, MassCEC is focused on supporting the advancement of cutting edge technologies in the wastewater treatment sector.  For these reasons, MassCEC collaborates with stakeholders to grow the promising water technology sector, supports innovative water technology testing and adoption of technologies that will help shape the future of the water technology industry.  

Innovation at Wastewater Treatment Plants - Who's Eligible?

Applicant teams must be led by a publicly-owned municipal wastewater treatment district or authority in Massachusetts, with at least one partner applicant that is a technology vendor. Together, applicant team must have a strong interest and capability to pilot and subsequently adopt a water innovation technology that addresses one the three focus areas: (1) increasing energy efficiency, (2) recovering resources for reuse, or (3) removing nutrients including nitrogen and phosphorous.

Investments - Apply

Step 1: Contact the MassCEC Investments Team to set up an initial meeting. Please provide a pitch deck with your initial outreach.

Step 2: Pitch to the MassCEC investments team.

Step 3: If your company may be a fit for a MassCEC investment, staff will request and internally review due diligence materials as part of an iterative process. 

Step 4: Pending a positive diligence outcome, pitch to MassCEC's CEO and other executive-level staff.

Investments - FAQ

What is the typical size of a MassCEC equity investment?

The average size of a MassCEC equity investment is $500,000, but investments have ranged anywhere from $100,000 - $1,500,000. Additionally, MassCEC reserves up to $250,000 per-company for aggregate follow-on investments. Our financial support is designed to decrease over time in accordance with MassCEC's follow-on policy

Investments - Who's Eligible

Only Massachusetts-based applicants that fit the MassCEC definition of “clean energy” (defined in the MassCEC enabling legislation here) are eligible. Typically, we require at least three of  a company’s headquarters, manufacturing, sales and research and development be based in Massachusetts.

 

Learn and Earn - Apply

Thank you for your interest. The 2016 Learn and Earn solicitation is currently closed, and applications are no longer being accepted. Please check back here in the future for future iterations of this opportunity.

For more information, interested parties can view a recording of MassCEC's 2016 Learn and Earn Webinar here

Learn and Earn - Background

Learn and Earn was launched as a pilot program in the summer of 2014. Over 100 high school students have since participated in the program and have received employment during the summer as well as academic year training with curriculum focused on clean energy. Selected applicants will design and deliver a training program to high school students that provides (i) career exploration, (ii) work readiness training, (iii) paid work-based learning that focuses on clean energy and (iv) dual enrollment that provides credit from a high education institution.

Learn and Earn - Eligibility

The Learn and Earn program is open to all Massachusetts higher education institutions offering 2 and 4 year degrees, Massachusetts secondary and vocational-technical high schools, community-based and non-profit organizations, with 501(c)(3) status, located in Massachusetts, community-based organizations providing youth services, workforce investment boards and labor unions. Applicants are required to partner with at least one clean energy employer and higher education institution, if this institution is not the lead applicant.

Learn and Earn- FAQ

Q: Do students have to pass their first year, or is it satisfactory for them to just complete their first year?

A: As long as they are still in your high school they would still be eligible. Individuals who have dropped out of your school are not eligible to participate in this program.

 

Q: If we're applying as a vocational school, do we still need to have higher education partner?

A: Yes, you will still need to have a higher education partner as part of your team.

 

Mass Solar Connect (Government/Non-Profit) - How Do I Apply?

MassCEC is currently accepting proposals from member-based non-profit groups to participate in the 2016 Mass Solar Connect program. Interested non-profit groups should review the below Non-Profit Group Request for Proposals and submit a completed application to SolarConnect@MassCEC.com by June 17, 2016. Non-profit groups with a clear and comprehensive outreach plan, an engaged team and interested members are encouraged to apply. 

Organics to Energy (Government/Non-Profit) - How Do I Apply?

Implementation and Pilot Projects -- solicitation is now OPEN until further notice.  

Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis, as received.  While there is currently no deadline for applications, the solicitation may close at any time.

Those considering applying for a grant are encouraged to discuss their project informally with MassCEC staff as early as possible during the preparation of an application; contact information is provided in the solicitation.

Organics to Energy (Government/Non-Profit) - Who's Eligible?

Projects must be located within the service territory of the electric distribution companies that pay into the Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust Fund, which is administered by MassCEC.

Funding is available to both public and private entities for Implementation and Pilot Projects and for Feasibility Studies, and to public entities for Technical Studies/Services.

Organics to Energy - How to Apply

Implementation and Pilot Projects -- solicitation is now OPEN until further notice.  

Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis, as received.  While there is currently no deadline for applications, the solicitation may close at any time.

Those considering applying for a grant are encouraged to discuss their project informally with MassCEC staff as early as possible during the preparation of an application; contact information is provided in the solicitation.

PTS Reports

Below are reports generated from data in the Production Tracking System:

Solar PV Systems in MA Report: A report detailing solar photovoltaic (PV) systems installed in Massachusetts that have registered for the Production Tracking System (PTS). Data includes project cost, location, panels (modules), inverters, meters and installer information.

Solarize Mass (Government/Non-Profit) - How Do I Apply?

MassCEC and DOER are currently accepting community proposals for the 2017 Solarize Mass program, with a goal of selecting up to 10 communities or groups of communities. Of these ten communities, MassCEC and DOER may elect to select up to two (2) communities (or groups of communities) who have specifically applied to participate in a Solarize Mass Plus multiple-technology pilot. Interested communities should review the request for proposal documents below. Completed applications should be submitted to Solarize@MassCEC.com.

Solarize Mass (Government/Non-Profit) - Program Background

Now in its seventh year, Solarize Mass is a partnership between MassCEC and the Green Communities Division of the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources (DOER).

How it works

The Solarize Mass program looks to increase the adoption of small-scale solar electricity systems through a grassroots educational campaign, driven mainly by local volunteers and reduced pricing that increases the savings for participants. 

Solarize Mass (Government/Non-Profit) - Who's Eligible?

The following communities are participating in the 2016 Solarize Mass program: Bolton, Medfield, Somerville, Upton and the partnership of Windsor-Cummington-Goshen-Worthington.

The 2017 Solarize Mass program is currently accepting applications. See the “How Do I Apply?” tab for more information.

Communities interested in participating in Solarize Mass must be serviced by a utility that pays into the Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust.

Solarize Mass - Apply

2017 Solarize Mass

MassCEC and DOER are currently accepting community proposals for the 2017 Solarize Mass program, with a goal of selecting up to 10 communities or groups of communities. Of these ten communities, MassCEC and DOER may elect to select up to two (2) communities (or groups of communities) who have specifically applied to participate in the Solarize Mass Plus multiple-technology pilot.

Solarize Mass - Program Background

Now in its seventh year, Solarize Mass is a partnership between MassCEC and the Green Communities Division of the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources (DOER).

How it works

The Solarize Mass program looks to increase the adoption of small-scale solar electricity systems through a grassroots educational campaign, driven mainly by local volunteers and reduced pricing that increases the savings for participants. 

Solarize Mass - Who's Eligible?

The 2017 Solarize Mass program is currently accepting community applications. See the "How Do I Apply?" tab for more details.

The following communities are participating in the 2016 Solarize Mass program: Bolton, Medfield, Somerville, Upton and the partnership of Windsor-Cummington-Goshen-Worthington.  If you live in one of these communities, you can contact the respective community volunteer team via the below contact information until the below program deadline:

Solarize Mass Bolton: 

Successful Women - Apply

The completed Application and all other documentation should be submitted to Tamika Jacques at tjacques@masscec.com. “Successful Women in Clean Energy” must appear in the email subject line. Applicants should email two (2) copies, one (1) in PDF Format and one (1) in Microsoft Word Format.

Applications must be received no later than August 12, 2016 at 2 p.m. Interested applicants can also watch the SWICE RFP Webinar for additional information.

Successful Women - Eligibility

This funding opportunity is open to Massachusetts Higher Education Institutions offering 2 and 4 year degrees, Community-based and non-profit organizations, with 501(c)(3) status, located in Massachusetts, Clean Energy Employers, Community-Based Organizations, Workforce Investment Boards, Labor Unions and Workforce Training Providers. Preference will be given to training providers that have experience in developing relationships with employers, working with POP populations and placing trainees in On-the-Job Training (OJT) permanent employment.

Successful Women - FAQ

1. If a trainer chose to train 20, is it required to be 2 cohorts of 10?

If a Training Provider takes on 20 trainees, you are not required to train them in 2 separate cohorts of 10 individuals each. The Training Provider could choose to take on 20 and then decide to train them all at once if they would like, which may be the more cost-effective approach.

 

Successful Women - Program Background

Successful Women in Clean Energy (SWICE) is a training program created in 2015 that prepares qualifying adult women for clean energy positions in sales and business management. Individuals receive training intended to support educational and career pathways in clean energy that lead to economic self-sufficiency and are then placed with an employer for a paid 6-month fellowship.

Venture Debt Investments - How Do I Apply?

Step 1: Contact the Investments team to set up an initial meeting. Please provide a pitch deck with your initial outreach.

Step 2: Pitch to the MassCEC investments team.

Step 3: If your company may be a fit for a MassCEC venture debt investment, staff will request and internally review due diligence materials as part of an iterative process. 

Step 4: Pending a positive diligence outcome, pitch to the MassCEC CEO and other executive-level staff.